Thrifty mother reveals how to make oat flour in three simple steps

A thrifty Louisiana mother has revealed how you can make flour in just a few moments, as people across the globe struggle to get their hands on essentials amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Food blogger and author Laura Fuentes, from Madisonville, took to her recipe blog Momables to reshare a YouTube video she shared revealing how to make oat flour.

Explaining that oat flour can be used for gluten-free baking, Laura demonstrated how it takes less than a minute to turn a cup of oats into a cup of flour, using a food processor or blender.

Meanwhile Scientist Sudeep Agarwala, from Boston, shared his makeshift recipe to making yeast with dried fruit after it became one of the ingredients to fly off the shelves in supermarkets when people began preparing for lock-down. Sachets of the baker’s essential has also sold out on Amazon in recent days. 

A thrifty Louisiana mother has revealed how you can make flour in just a few moments, as people across the globe struggle to get their hands on essentials amid the coronavirus pandemic

A thrifty Louisiana mother has revealed how you can make flour in just a few moments, as people across the globe struggle to get their hands on essentials amid the coronavirus pandemic

A thrifty Louisiana mother has revealed how you can make flour in just a few moments, as people across the globe struggle to get their hands on essentials amid the coronavirus pandemic

Laura revealed: ‘You can either use a food processor and blender.

‘Oat flour is a great alternative to use for gluten free baking. Get some oats, add them into the food processor, and turn it on to blend until you have a fine powder like consistency. 

‘The best part is that there’s not a lot of conversion needed – if you’re using one cup of oats you will get approximately one cup of oat flour.

‘You can repeat the same process in your blender, it’s simple!

‘To store it, seal it in a zip bag or the flour will go stale pretty fast. It will last you three months in the pantry’.

Explaining that oat flour can be used for gluten-free baking, Laura demonstrated how it takes less than a minute to turn a cup of oats into a cup of flour, using a food processor or blender

Explaining that oat flour can be used for gluten-free baking, Laura demonstrated how it takes less than a minute to turn a cup of oats into a cup of flour, using a food processor or blender

Explaining that oat flour can be used for gluten-free baking, Laura demonstrated how it takes less than a minute to turn a cup of oats into a cup of flour, using a food processor or blender

Laura revealed you can make everything from porridge, bread to cakes with oat flour

Laura revealed you can make everything from porridge, bread to cakes with oat flour

Laura revealed you can make everything from porridge, bread to cakes with oat flour

Laura revealed you can make everything from porridge, bread to cakes with oat flour.

She explained: ‘Typically oat flour be substituted for regular wheat or flour in a recipe in the same amount, one cup oat flour = 1 cup regular wheat flour.

How to make oat flour 

  1. Get a cup of oats (ration 1:1)
  2. Put it into a blender or processor
  3. Grind it for about minute until smooth 
  4.  Store in a ziplock bag for 3 months

‘This is especially true for recipes made for whole-wheat recipes, say, whole-wheat muffins etc’.

Replying to her simple trick, one follower wrote: ‘This just dawned on me – I googled making oat flour. thank you for this information. I am ready to try it, and hoping I can buy more oats if I can’t buy flour and bread in the supermarket. 

‘New Zealand has buy outs of bread and flour too!! If you are not in the shop at the time shelves are filled you need to go back, and who wants to do that just now with covid 19 around!! keep safe.’

Another American user added: ‘I thought I had a 10 lb bag of flour in the pantry. Walmart doesn’t have any left. But I have lots and lots of Oats!!! Thank goodness!’.

Laura revealed: 'You can either use a food processor and blender', and racked up praise from followers unable to get their hands on flour in the shops

Laura revealed: 'You can either use a food processor and blender', and racked up praise from followers unable to get their hands on flour in the shops

Laura revealed: ‘You can either use a food processor and blender’, and racked up praise from followers unable to get their hands on flour in the shops

American user added: 'I thought I had a 10 lb bag of flour in the pantry. Walmart doesn't have any left. But I have lots and lots of Oats!!! Thank goodness!'

American user added: 'I thought I had a 10 lb bag of flour in the pantry. Walmart doesn't have any left. But I have lots and lots of Oats!!! Thank goodness!'

American user added: ‘I thought I had a 10 lb bag of flour in the pantry. Walmart doesn’t have any left. But I have lots and lots of Oats!!! Thank goodness!’

Scientist Sudeep Agarwala, from Boston, has been sharing photos of his own successful bakes - and revealed how to make your own yeasts after supermarkets - and even amazon - sold out of the essential bread-making ingredient

Scientist Sudeep Agarwala, from Boston, has been sharing photos of his own successful bakes - and revealed how to make your own yeasts after supermarkets - and even amazon - sold out of the essential bread-making ingredient

Scientist Sudeep Agarwala, from Boston, has been sharing photos of his own successful bakes – and revealed how to make your own yeasts after supermarkets – and even amazon – sold out of the essential bread-making ingredient

Elsewhere a biologist has revealed how people who can’t get hold of yeast for baking can create their own at home – using just a little water and some flour and dried fruit.

Writing on Twitter under the handle @shoelaces3, Agarwala penned his own step-by-step guide to making yeast that can then be used to bake bread. 

He told his followers: ‘Friends, I learned last night over Zoom drinks that ya’ll’re baking so much that there’s a shortage of yeast?! I, your local frumpy yeast geneticist have come here to tell you this: THERE IS NEVER A SHORTAGE OF YEAST.’

The scientist then unleashed a thread revealing how to make your own yeast using dried fruits, flour and water – with a good dash of time thrown in. 

He instructed people to ‘scour’ their kitchen for fruits such as apricots, raisins, grapes and prunes.  

‘Take your fruit (or, if using fresh fruit skins – please use your judgement), pop it into a jar, and add a little bit of water to it. 2 or 3 tablespoons (30-40 mL) is more than enough. If you stir the fruit around, you’ll notice the water gets slightly cloudy. That’s the yeast!’

After that, Agarwala advised people to add an ‘equal mass’ of flour to the mixture – any type will do, before writing: ‘And then you wait. You’ll want to keep this warm (but not hot). 

‘Hug it while you binge Netflix. Cuddle it while you yearn for human touch once again. Or put it on the counter while your dishwasher is running. Do it right and after 12 hours you’ll see bubbles. These will grow.’

THE BIOLOGIST’S RECIPE: MAKING YOUR OWN YEAST USING FRUIT 

  •  Put some dried fruit, raisins, apricots or prunes, for example, into a jar with 30 to 40ml of cold water
  • When the water turns cloudy, add 30 to 40 grams of flour to the mixture 
  • Leave somewhere warm for 12 hours to allow the yeast bubbles to grow
  • Take some of your mixture and repeat the water and flour process, adding 30 to 40 ml of cold water and 30, 40 grams of flour – leave for 24 hours 
  • Your yeast – now very bubbly – should be ready to use in baking

 

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